<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN">
<HTML><HEAD>
<META http-equiv=Content-Type content="text/html; charset=ISO-8859-1">
<META content="MSHTML 6.00.6000.16441" name=GENERATOR></HEAD>
<BODY id=role_body style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; COLOR: #000000; FONT-FAMILY: Arial" 
bottomMargin=7 leftMargin=7 topMargin=7 rightMargin=7><FONT id=role_document 
face=Arial color=#000000 size=2>
<DIV>
<DIV>
<DIV>In a message dated 15/05/2007 16:40:50 GMT Standard Time, 
philip_denton@5TJEpU0Xy-krqyfP6FpFuA_NDANprv46FlA-FqJYhnxZPCqABhqBPZEYCmy63ILq18sR0Ac2PnwSqvXtf6Zf.yahoo.invalid writes:</DIV>
<BLOCKQUOTE 
style="PADDING-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; BORDER-LEFT: blue 2px solid"><FONT 
  style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: transparent" face=Georgia color=#000000 size=2>The 
  schedule for last week's Somerset open day stated that the 3 at Downhead were 
  hung for full circle ringing for the first time at the recent restoration. How 
  were they hung before, and how long had they been derelict? It seemed to me to 
  be a very successful restoration, creating a good little 
ring.</FONT></BLOCKQUOTE></DIV>
<DIV></DIV>Thanks for your comments.</DIV>
<DIV> </DIV>
<DIV>The 3 at Downhead have been hung for ringing since they were first 
installed. The bellframe was replaced early in the 20th century and the bells 
were rehung on their original fittings. It seems that the fittings were in poor 
condition at this point, so the bells were adapted for clocking. The tenor bell 
became cracked as a result & the whole installation fell into a derelict 
state. When I first looked at the bells about 18 years ago, the supporting 
ironwork was dangerous to the point that 2 of the bells could have fallen. I 
lashed the bells to their headstocks with blue poly rope. The situation remained 
the same until we took the bells out last year.</DIV>
<DIV> </DIV>
<DIV>The local aggregate levy gave a grant of 5k to restore the bells. Several 
options were discussed and we settled on a scheme to repair the tenor and hang 
the bells for swing chiming. I then remembered about three good wheels which had 
come from Whitmore, Staffs (These were replaced when we augmented Whitmore to 
six). These were the perfect sizes for Downhead, so we managed to draw up a 
scheme to strengthen (tie-bolt) the frame and hang the bells for ringing, using 
the Whitmore wheels and various other second hand fittings (The wrought iron 
clappers came from Whitmore, Maperton & Sittingbourne from memory). We made 
new timber headstocks and bought some cheap ball bearings off ebay. The tenor 
was weld repaired and the cast in crown staples removed from all three bells. 
The whole installation work was completed in a day - we made up three ropes out 
of some old bits (we managed to fing 3 matching sallies from Lyminge, Kent). 
All of this enabled this unique William Bilbie ring to be heard again, 
for the first time in at least 80 years. A local band is currently being 
trained. Sadly a proposed augmentation scheme has been declined for now, despite 
one of the bells being offered as a donation. </DIV>
<DIV> </DIV>
<DIV>I think that just about covers it all. A picture of the rehung 3 is 
attached.</DIV>
<DIV> </DIV>
<DIV>Matthew</DIV>
<DIV> </DIV>
<DIV> </DIV>
<DIV> </DIV>
<DIV><FONT size=2 PTSIZE="10">Matthew Higby & Company Ltd,<BR>Church Bell 
Engineers,<BR>Jasmine Cottage,<BR>The Street,<BR>Chilcompton,<BR>Bath,<BR>BA3 
4HN.<BR><BR>www.bell-hangers.com</FONT></DIV></FONT>   </BODY></HTML>
           
-------------------------------1179245849----part1_d36.7d6097a.337b3720_boundary 
Content-Type: image/jpeg; name="Downhead Rehung.jpg"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: base64
Content-Disposition: inline; filename="Downhead Rehung.jpg"

[Attachment content not displayed.]