<div dir="ltr"><div class="gmail_default"><div class="gmail_default"><font face="courier new, monospace">On Sun, Apr 9, 2017 at 2:58 PM, Alan Burlison <<a href="mailto:alan.burlison@gmail.com">alan.burlison@gmail.com</a>> wrote:</font></div><div class="gmail_default"><font face="courier new, monospace">> Err, easy, no?</font></div><div class="gmail_default"><font face="courier new, monospace"><br></font></div><div class="gmail_default"><font face="courier new, monospace">In the brain of the beholder, I suppose. I was referring to the table (which can be found in various places in the Council's method collections, I sent a URL in my previous message to one such location) that maps letters to particular lead ends. Perhaps it's just I, but I find it exceedingly counterintuitive that Plain Bob Minor, Major and Royal have Plain Bob lead heads "a", while Plain Bob Triples and Caters have Plain Bob lead heads "p", while "a" is reserved for Grandsire type methods at Triples and Caters. To my way of thinking Plain Bob at all stages basically has the same darn lead heads, but the Council in its wisdom disagrees.</font></div><div class="gmail_default"><font face="courier new, monospace"><br></font></div><div class="gmail_default"><font face="courier new, monospace">Intriguingly, I think the reason this is done is essentially a corollary to the mistaken insistence on having a one size fits all scheme for extending methods. Which, in this case, is particularly amusing as the Council has found it necessary to make a special dispensation, as ¬†otherwise according to the Council Plain Bob can't always be called "Plain Bob"*! :-)</font></div><div class="gmail_default"><font face="courier new, monospace"><br></font></div><div class="gmail_default"><font face="courier new, monospace"><br></font></div><div class="gmail_default"><font face="courier new, monospace"><br></font></div><div class="gmail_default"><font face="courier new, monospace">* And yes, I understand that names involving "Plain Bob" and "Grandsire" also have some historical baggage.</font></div><div class="gmail_default"><font face="courier new, monospace"><br></font></div><div class="gmail_default"><font face="courier new, monospace"><br></font></div><div class="gmail_default"><font face="courier new, monospace"><br></font></div><div class="gmail_default"><font face="courier new, monospace"><br></font></div><div class="gmail_default"><font face="courier new, monospace">--¬†</font></div><div class="gmail_default"><font face="courier new, monospace">Don Morrison <<a href="mailto:dfm@ringing.org">dfm@ringing.org</a>></font></div><div class="gmail_default"><font face="courier new, monospace">"It is tempting to call this unctuous ooze of status updates and</font></div><div class="gmail_default"><font face="courier new, monospace">vacation snaps seeping across Facebook and Twitter and the rest</font></div><div class="gmail_default"><font face="courier new, monospace">information overload. But that would be to debase the word</font></div><div class="gmail_default"><font face="courier new, monospace">'information.'" ¬†-- Roger Cohen, _New York Times_, 6 December 2012</font></div><div style="font-family:"courier new",monospace"><br></div></div></div>